Audi technology


Audi Technology Portal

Engines and drivetrain are signature areas of excellence at Audi. The brand with the four rings has played a crucial pioneering role in a host of technical fields - from TDI and TSFI powerplants to transmission technologies to quattro permanent all-wheel drive.

  • 1.4 TDI 2014

    The new 1.4 TDI follows the two-liter four-cylinder engine as the second engine in the Volkswagen Group's modular diesel engine platform (MDB). The three-cylinder unit is designed as a transverse engine and will enter volume production shortly. It has a displacement of 1,422 cc. The stroke of 95.5 millimeters (3.8 in) is taken from the 2.0 TDI; the bore has been reduced from 81.0 to 79.5 millimeters (3.2 to 3.1 in). Cylinder spacing is 88.0 millimeters (3.5 in).

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  • 3.0 TDI 2014

    The 3.0 TDI represents the very latest technology. The Audi bestseller in the large model series is now even cleaner and satisfies the requirements of the Euro 6 emissions standard. Performance has also increased. Output is 200 kW (272 hp), the maximum torque of 580 Nm (427.8 lb-ft) is available between 1,250 and 3,250 rpm.

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  • V8 4.2 TDI 2014

    The 4.2 TDI has more torque than any other engine in the Audi lineup. The latest version in the Audi A8 delivers 850 Nm (626.9 lb-ft) between 2,000 and 2,750 revolutions per minute. Its peak output of 283 kW (385 hp) is available at just 3,750 rpm.

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  • 3.0 TDI Biturbo with electrically driven compressor

    The TDI engine gets its power from the boost pressure developed by the turbocharger, which is dependent on the energy of the exhaust. The electric biturbo breaks this dependency. Its supplemental electric compressor enables a rapid buildup of boost pressure and high torque even at low engine speeds. 25 years after the invention of the TDI, Audi is now taking the next big step and making the diesel engine even more emotional and sporty.

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  • Emissions controls

    In the past, the developers had to design emissions-control components for early response. As the efficiency of the TDI engines increases, exhaust gas temperatures are steadily falling. In the ECE cycle, temperatures measured downstream of the oxidation catalytic converter take 2.5 minutes to reach 150 degrees Celsius. Conversion does not take place below this threshold.

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  • 3.0 TDi Biturbo ENG

    The top version of the 3.0 TDI is a high-performance diesel engine, with which Audi is setting new standards for performance and efficiency. The twin-turbo design features two turbochargers connected in series that both provide thrust.

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  • Abgasrückführung ENG

    In all internal combustion engines, undesirable nitrogen oxides are formed when combustion takes place at high temperatures with excess air. These gases can be largely avoided, however, through the use of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR).

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  • Chain Drive

    In every reciprocating engine, inertial forces and moments of inertia develop due to the oscillating motion of the pistons and connecting rods and the transmission behavior of the crankshaft drive. In some engine configurations, such as the V12 with 60 degrees of crankshaft rotation, these forces balance one another out and thus have no effect on normal driving. In an inline four-cylinder engine, however, free second-order forces of inertia detract from engine smoothness.

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  • Common rail four-cylinder

    For engine design engineers, the “rail” in a common rail system is a tubular high-pressure accumulator that maintains a supply of fuel at a constant high pressure. The rail is fed by a pump driven by the timing gear. The injectors are connected to the common rail by short steel pipes, and opened and closed by electrical impulses.

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  • Diesel particulate filter

    When diesel oil is burned in an engine, soot particles are formed in the combustion chamber in certain operating areas. To eliminate these particles, Audi uses diesel particulate filters – closed-circuit systems with an efficiency of more than 95 percent.

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  • Fuel-injection prozess

    Audi common rail systems are components of fascinating precision that inject tiny amounts of fuel into the combustion chambers. The fuel is released from the nozzles at pressures of up to 2,000 bar (29,008 psi) and at several times the speed of sound. In some engines, Audi uses piezo injectors with eight-hole nozzles, with each hole only 0.12 millimeters (0.0047 in) in diameter.

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  • piezo injectors

    The piezo principle is an ideal complement for common rail fuel injection. Piezo crystals change their structure in a few thousandths of a second by expanding slightly when an electrical voltage is applied to them. Several hundred piezo wafers are stacked one above the other in the injector. As this stack expands, linear movement takes place and is transmitted directly to the injector needle, with no mechanical linkage in between.

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  • V12 TDI

    The TDI used in production passenger cars is one of Audi’s groundbreaking innovations. Development of the engine began in the late 1970s, headed by the then Member of the Board of Management for Technical Development Dr. Ferdinand Piëch. In 1989, the direct-injection turbocharged diesel engine with fully electronic control celebrated its premiere in the Audi 100. The 2.5-liter five-cylinder engine set new standards with a power output of 88 kW (120 hp), a peak torque of 265 Nm (195.45 lb-ft) and excellent fuel efficiency. Far superior to all earlier engine concepts, it marked the beginning of a veritable boom in the new technology.

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  • Tumble flaps

    In many Audi engines, both TDI and gasoline models, switchable swirl and tumble flaps are housed in the intake area. These flaps allow the intake air to be perfectly modulated for specific loads and engine speeds. This creates a swirling motion that improves the air-fuel mixture and enhances power and torque, while at the same time lowering fuel consumption and decreasing emissions. The flaps are driven with either electric or pneumatic power, depending on their design.

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  • Turbocharger with variable turbine geometry (VTG)

    In all TDI engines from Audi, the turbochargers have variable turbine geometry on the exhaust side. Variable turbine geometry (VTG) technology builds up torque smoothly and without delay, even at low engine speeds.

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  • Audi R8 Spyder V10 - drivetrain

    From 0 to 100 km/h (62.1 mph) in 3.6 seconds, 11.8 seconds for the sprint from 0 to 200 km/h (124.3 mph) and a top speed of 318 km/h (197.6 mph) sum up the dynamic performance of the new Audi R8 Spyder*. It sprints to 100 km/h (62.1 mph) two-tenths of a second faster than its predecessor, reaches the 200 km/h (124.3 mph) mark six-tenths of a second sooner and delivers 7 km/h (4.3 mph) more top speed.

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  • Audi TT RS Coupé and Roadster – 2.5 TFSI, powertrain

    The five-cylinder achieves a good 17 percent more output from the unchanged displacement of 2,480 cc – 294 kW (400 hp) means a specific value of 161.3 hp per liter. The maximum torque of 480 Nm (354.0 lb-ft) is available from 1,700 rpm and remains constant up to 5,850 rpm. The new Audi TT RS Coupé thus accelerates from 0 to 100 km/h (62.1 mph) in 3.7 seconds; the Roadster takes 3.9 seconds. Standard top speed is a governed 250 km/h (155.3 mph). Audi will raise the top speed to 280 km/h (174.0 mph) upon request.

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  • Audi S5 Coupé – 3.0 TFSI, drive train

    The completely redesigned, turbocharged 3.0 TFSI engine for the Audi S5 Coupé offers powerful performance: high power, ample torque, spontaneous response and a sonorous sound. All of that paired with a new level of efficiency.

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  • Audi A4 2.0 TFSI ultra

    The 2.0 TFSI with a displacement of 1,984 cc is available in the new the Audi A4 ultra and A4 Avant ultra. Its technical refinements are the exhaust manifold integrated into the cylinder head, the rotary-valve model for thermal management, the Audi valve-lift system (AVS) for the intake valves, the electric wastegate of the turbocharger and the dual fuel injection. In partial load, indirect injection in the inlet manifold supplements the FSI direct injection. ection.

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  • Audi RS 3 Sportback 2.5 TFSI

    The multiple award-winning 2.5 TFSI produces 270 kW (367 hp) and 465 Nm (343.0 lb‑ft) of torque in the new RS 3 Sportback. The turbocharged engine accelerates the compact five‑door from 0 to 100 km/h in 4.3 seconds, and top speed can be increased to 280 km/h (174.0 mph) upon request. In the NEDC, it consumes just 8.1 liters of fuel per 100 kilometers (29.0 US mpg), with CO2 emissions of 189 grams per kilometer (304.2 g/mi).

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  • 1.8 TFSI

    A central innovation in the 1.8 TFSI is the addition of indirect fuel injection. Indirect injection supplements FSI direct fuel injection in the part-load range. This lowers fuel consumption and reduces particulate emissions to within the limits of the future Euro 6 standard. FSI fuel injection is active when starting and at higher loads. The valve control system has been given greater operating freedom. The Audi valvelift system, which adjusts the lift of the valves as needed, is active on the exhaust side; the camshafts can also be adjusted.

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  • Aud valvelift system

    The Audi valvelift system, one of the major innovations of the brand with the four rings, regulates the lift of the valves in two stages depending on load and engine speed. The system thus increases torque while also reducing fuel consumption.

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  • In the A8 L, Audi’s top-of-the-line model, a twelve-cylinder powerplant provides outstanding propulsion. The “W12” abbreviation alludes to the unusual configuration of the 6.3-liter FSI engine: four rows consisting of three cylinders each. Two rows in each case face each other in an offset configuration at a 15-degree angle, collectively forming a single broad bank. Both cylinder banks thus form a 72-degree V configuration.

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  • cylinder on demand

    The new 4.0 TFSI, a powerful V8 with twin turbochargers, is equipped with “cylinder on demand” technology. When operating at part load, four of its cylinders are deactivated. This reduces fuel consumption by an average of five percent. To complement this system there are two further technologies: Active noise control (ANC) and active engine mounts. They ensure that the car’s occupants do not hear or sense any disturbing noise or vibration even if the engine is operating in the four-cylinder mode.

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  • FSI common rail

    At Audi, FSI stands for gasoline direct injection, a technology in which fuel is injected directly into the combustion chambers, rather than into the intake manifold in the traditional manner. More favorable in terms of thermodynamics, this method improves the efficiency of the engine. FSI engines achieve higher performance and better dynamics than conventional engines, with better efficiency. Whether they have four, five, six, eight, ten or twelve cylinders, all gasoline engines from Audi today employ the FSI principle.

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  • Audi A1 Sportback

    A clear sign of the popularity of the Audi A1* and A1 Sportback* is the over 500,000 cars sold since its market launch in 2010. Six engines – gasoline and diesel – are new or have been intensively further developed. For the first time, Audi is offering completely new three-cylinder engines, the 1.0 TFSI and the 1.4 TDI – they are efficient without neglecting driving fun. 

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  • Exhaust turbocharger

    Downsizing has a long legacy at Audi – the first turbocharged gasoline engine, a five-cylinder unit, was produced as early as the late 1970s. Today the brand uses a turbocharger on all its four- and five-cylinder engines, both TDI and TFSI units, to increase performance and torque. Certain large V-engines employ two chargers according to the bi-turbo principle.

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  • Supercharger

    Alongside exhaust gas turbochargers, Audi also makes use of superchargers to boost its engines. A supercharger is used in the 3.0 TFSI. The high-efficiency mechanical charger is situated in the 90-degree V formed by the cylinder banks and is driven by the engine via a poly-V belt. The gas pathways downstream of the charger are very short, thus the torque develops quickly and easily. The full boost is available even at idle.

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  • Intercooler

    As a turbocharger compresses the intake air, it heats up, reaching temperatures between 120 and 150 degrees Celsius (between 248 and 302 degrees Fahrenheit). Hot air has a lower density, however, and thus contains less oxygen for combustion. A charge-air cooler is therefore placed downstream of the turbocharger to cool the compressed air before it enters the combustion chamber.

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  • Delivery-on-demand oil pump

    The engine ancillaries offer tremendous potential for efficiency. A new generation of oil pumps, which Audi employs in a number of models, are an important component. Smaller in terms of delivery rate, these volumetric-flow-controlled oil pumps operate only as required, and no longer need to circulate oil continuously.

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  • Combustion engines are subject to friction losses, in which a portion of the power disappears in the mechanical interaction of the engine components. The greatest losses occur in the crankshaft – at the pistons with their sealing rings, at the connecting rod bearings and at the main bearings of the crankshaft.

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  • Thermal management

    The novel thermal management system, an innovation from Audi in many engines, lowers fuel consumption by up to 3 percent. Rather than being circulated, the coolant remains still during the warm-up phase so that the engine oil quickly reaches its operating temperature of between 80 and 120 degrees Celsius (between 176 and 248 degrees Fahrenheit). This significantly shortens the phase of greater frictional resistance due to viscous oil in the crankshaft drive and valve gear.

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  • Many engines in many Audi models operate in conjunction with a standard start-stop system. In terms of drivetrains, there are practically no limitations: manual transmissions are just as well suited for this technology as automatic transmissions.

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  • Found in much of the Audi model line-up – from the compact A1 to the R8 – manual transmissions are suited for pairing with front-wheel drive and quattro drive. While most manual transmissions operate with six gears, some use five gears.

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  • multitronic

    The continuously variable multitronic is an option for many Audi models with a longitudinal engine and front-wheel drive. Like all transmissions from Audi, it offers outstanding features such as low internal friction, a wide gear-ratio spread and high efficiency. The smooth multitronic nearly always allows the engine to operate in its optimal efficiency range. For dynamic drivers, it offers a sport program with closer gear ratios and a manual mode with eight stepped gears.

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  • Audi A6 Avant ultra – 7-speed S tronic

    The S tronic dual-clutch transmission is a successful technology. It combines the convenience of an automatic with the efficiency of a manual transmission, while adding its own dynamic touch. Throughout much of the model line-up, the S tronic is available in four different versions, with six or seven gears.

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  • The great strength of this classic torque-converter transmission lies in its remarkably smooth shift action and starting performance. Audi uses tiptronic in many models with longitudinally mounted engines, with either six or eight gears depending on the model line.

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  • The manual and automatic transmissions from Audi are highly efficient. Irrespective of design, they have all been optimized with regard to internal friction and are notable for their wide gear-ratio spread.

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  • Audi Q5 – quattro with ultra-technology

    With the exception of the 3.0 TDI, all Q5 versions have the completely newly developed quattro with ultra technology. It offers maximum efficiency and does not perceptibly differ from permanent systems in terms of traction and driving dynamics.

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  • Audi Q2 – 2.0 TDI quattro S tronic

    The quattro permanent all-wheel drive system ensures optimal traction and handling under any road conditions. It comes standard with the 2.0 TFSI and the 2.0 TDI with an output of 140 kW (190 hp). It is optionally available for the 2.0 TDI with an output of 110 kW (150 hp).

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  • Audi quattro with ultra-technology

    With quattro permanent all-wheel drive, Audi has extended its lead over a period of more than three decades. Now it’s time for the next big step: quattro in combination with ultra technology.

    The development goal of quattro with ultra technology is an all-wheel drive system optimized for efficiency with no discernible differences to permanent systems with respect to traction and driving dynamics. The system should set benchmarks in its class for fuel consumption and CO2 emissions, particularly under everyday conditions. With correspondingly equipped test vehicles, Audi developers used on average 0.3 liters/100 kilometers less fuel than with conventional all-wheel drive. The tests were conducted on a route throughout the Ingolstadt area and in normal traffic.

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  • Audi R8 V10 Plus – Drivetrain

    In the powertrain, the lightning-quick shifts of the seven-speed S tronic dualclutch transmission, an optimized mechanical differential lock and a new electrohydraulically activated multi-plate clutch work together. The actively cooled allwheel drive system can distribute torque freely between the axles. The intelligent dynamic control system for the quattro drive is incorporated into the Audi drive select dynamic handling system that offers four basic modes. 

    In each mode, the new high-performance sports car expresses a different character – from relaxed freeway cruiser to race car on the circuit track. In the top R8 V10 plus model, a performance leather steering wheel is standard equipment. In its performance mode, it offers three additional modes: dry, wet and snow. They make handling even more precise and sharper, tuned to the friction coefficient of the specific road surface. The new technology is also available on the R8 V10, including the steering wheel that is used to select the special modes.

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  • S1 quattro

    Like all Audi S models the Audi S1 and the S1 Sportback (7.0 / 7.1 liters of fuel per 100 kilometers [33.60 / 33.13 US mpg]; 162 / 166 grams of CO2 per kilometer [260.71 / 267.15 g/mile]) come with permanent all-wheel drive – another USP in this segment. Weight distribution constraints mean the hydraulic multi-plate clutch is mounted on the rear axle (axle load distribution: front 60 percent, rear 40 percent). Depending on the driving situation, the electronically controlled clutch distributes the drive torque between the axles. If one of the axles starts to slip, the torque is instantly redirected to the other axle. The management of the multi-plate clutch is decidedly dynamic. It allows controlled drifts on a road surface with a low coefficient of friction in sport mode or with deactivated ESC.

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  • The first Audi quattro, which debuted in spring 1980, was a technical sensation. Its permanent all-wheel drive was lightweight, compact and fast-running, thus making it suitable for high speeds. The elegant quattro principle did not need the heavy, separate transfer case and weighty auxiliary shaft to the front axle that were the standard at the time. It was the first volume-built permanent all-wheel drive system suitable for fast and sporty cars.

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  • Torsen differential

    With the debut of the Audi 80 quattro in fall 1986, Audi introduced a new center differential – a component that was still strictly mechanical, but highly efficient. The name Torsen was a contraction of the words “torque” and “sensing.” The Torsen differential had already proved itself in the world of technology as a high-tech rear axle differential; Audi developed it further for use as a center differential.

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  • Hydraulic multi-plate clutch

    The Torsen differential is an excellent solution for a longitudinal engine and a drivetrain that runs in a straight line to the back. Audi chose an entirely different technology for the transverse-mounted engines in the compact models – an electronically controlled and hydraulically actuated multi-plate clutch. It first appeared in 1998 in the TT quattro and the A3 quattro.

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  • Self-locking center differential

    In 2005, Audi set off the next stage in the evolution of its classic quattro drive system in the second-generation RS 4. The new self-locking center differential, which is used in many models today, remained true to the principle of mechanical function, yet represented significant progress over the Torsen differential.

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  • Viscous coupling

    The Audi R8 high-performance sports car occupies a special position in the Audi model range – and this extends to its packaging and its drive system. The mid-mounted engine is arranged longitudinally at the rear of the car in front of the rear axle, with the gearbox right behind it. It also includes an auxiliary drive for a prop shaft running past the engine on the side and up to the front axle.

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  • Sport differential

    The self-locking center differential in the classic quattro drivetrain does an excellent job of distributing the power between the axles. To make driving even more dynamic, Audi introduced an additional component in the dynamic S4 Sedan in late 2008 that actively splits the torque between the wheels of the rear axle – the sport differential.

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  • Exactly 30 years after the debut of the first quattro, Audi introduced the latest evolutionary stage of its permanent all-wheel drive system for longitudinal front-mounted engines – quattro drive with crown gear differential and torque vectoring.

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Новые технологии Ауди - обзор - журнал За рулем

В словаре Audi появилось новое обозначение — h‑tron. Так назвали силовую установку на топливных элементах, работающую на водороде. Принцип не нов: молекулы водорода расщепляются на электроны, которые отдаются в электрическую цепь, и протоны, вступающие во взаимодействие с кислородом. В результате химической реакции образуется лишь водяной пар — абсолютно чистый выхлоп. Первым носителем новой установки стал лифтбек А7 Sportback. Его представили еще год назад, но для близкого знакомства выкатили впервые.

В баллонах хранится 5 кг водорода, обеспечивающих запас хода до 500 км. Полная заправка баллонов занимает три минуты. Позаимствованная у серийного гибрида Audi A3 e‑tron тяговая батарея дополнительно питает электромотор при интенсивном разгоне. Благодаря батарее можно вообще ездить только на запасенном электричестве (без водорода), но ее энергоемкость лишь 8,8 кВт·ч — полного заряда едва хватит на 50 км.

Под капотом Audi A7 h‑tron — установка из 300 топливных ячеек. Два электромотора, по одному на каждой оси, разгоняют машину до сотни за 7,9 с. Максималка — 200 км/ч. Полный привод реализован без жесткой связи между передними и задними колесами — благодаря согласованной работе электродвигателей.

Под капотом Audi A7 h‑tron — установка из 300 топливных ячеек. Два электромотора, по одному на каждой оси, разгоняют машину до сотни за 7,9 с. Максималка — 200 км/ч. Полный привод реализован без жесткой связи между передними и задними колесами — благодаря согласованной работе электродвигателей.

Под капотом Audi A7 h‑tron — установка из 300 топливных ячеек. Два электромотора, по одному на каждой оси, разгоняют машину до сотни за 7,9 с. Максималка — 200 км/ч. Полный привод реализован без жесткой связи между передними и задними колесами — благодаря согласованной работе электродвигателей.

Материалы по теме

Технически всё великолепно, но где инфраструктура? В Германии всего полтора десятка точек водородной заправки. К концу 2016 года их должно стать шестьдесят, а к 2020 году — четыреста. Вот лет через пять, глядишь, и проснется реальный интерес к водородомобилям.

Цены? Те еще! Дебютировавший в Токио (ЗР, 2015, № 12) седан Honda Clarity с силовой установкой на топливных элементах будет стоить в Японии 7,66 млн иен (более 4 млн рублей) — он дороже гибридного седана Legend (6,8 млн иен). Главная задача немцев к 2020 году — сделать водородные автомобили близкими по цене к электромобилям.

Парковка для батарей

При лавинообразно растущей моде на гибриды и электромобили производители упорно не дают ответов на вопрос, как утилизировать кучи отработавших срок аккумуляторов. Однако готовы рецепты, как их использовать до полного истощения.

Эксперты фирмы Audi говорят, что их батареи будут гарантированно работать в течение восьми лет, а расчетный срок службы — 15 лет. Когда батарея «устанет», ее отправят в так называемый аккумуляторный парк — хранилище электричества, получаемого от солнца, ветра или забираемого из обычной сети во время спада общего потребления. Запасенное электричество используется в моменты пиковых нагрузок на электросети или для заряда электромобилей. И лишь когда емкость батареи упадет до 10% начальной, ее отправят на переработку.

Развитие электрических технологий в интерпретации фирмы Audi.

Развитие электрических технологий в интерпретации фирмы Audi.

Развитие электрических технологий в интерпретации фирмы Audi.

Материалы по теме

Неожиданная отставка

Настоящий прорыв — создание электромеханического качающегося амортизатора eROT. Это рычаг, один конец которого закреплен на подвижном элементе подвески, а второй присоединен к компактному генератору. Вертикальные перемещения колеса на неровностях дороги передаются на рычаг, и благодаря его колебаниям вырабатывается электричество. Классического амортизатора при этом нет вовсе! Инженеры говорят, что разницу в ощущениях по сравнению с обычной адаптивной подвеской почувствовать невозможно.

Мне не показали ни опытный образец, ни даже чертежи — секрет! Но верю на слово немцам, которые утверждают, что eROT компактнее обычного амортизатора (компоновщики это оценят) и позволяет реализовать адаптивную подвеску, поскольку можно изменять степень сопротивления рычага. Система способна выдавать от 3 Вт на идеальном асфальте до 613 Вт на проселке. На ровных дорогах Германии получится в среднем 150 Вт. Поступившая в систему автомобиля «халявная» энергия снижает нагрузку на двигатель и, как следствие, уровень вредных выбросов. Инженеры говорят о сокращении CO₂ в выхлопе на 3 г/км.

Отличная идея! И почему до этого не додумались у нас, в стране вечно разбитых дорог?

Смена тяги: новые электрические технологии Audi

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Audi Technology Portal

The electrics/electronics area covers a broad field. It comprises the electrical control elements as well as the assistance and safety systems, multimedia systems and lightning technology. Audi leads the competition in all of these area with innovative solutions.

  • Audi R8 - Interior and Controls

    Behind the steering wheel of the new Audi R8*, the driver feels like a race car driver. All functions are driver-oriented and allow easy operation even when the critical limits are reached – and all without the driver having to take his or her hands off the steering wheel. The newly designed sport seats with integrated headrest provide excellent lateral support. Even more radical seating for a sports car comes in the form of the newly developed R8 bucket seats. These make a clear statement confirming the relationship between lightweight construction and comfort (optional in the V10 and standard in the V10 plus).

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  • Audi is driving progress in the area of controls and displays at a rapid pace. A central topic here is the MMI touch. In the next generation, the touchpad will be even more tightly integrated into the MMI control terminal as the surface of the rotary pushbutton, enabling it to also be installed in vehicles with less available space. The new solution makes operation even easier because the driver’s right hand can always rest in the same place. The number of surrounding function buttons will be reduced.

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  • Audi R8 - Interior and Controls

    Clearly structured and intuitive controls are one of Audi’s great strengths.  This is true of every model, from the A1 to the R8 and from the Q7 to the A8. The driver is perfectly integrated in the cockpit of every Audi. The large instruments can be easily read at a glance. Every last control element is logically arranged; each of them provides clear and precise haptic and acoustic feedback when it is actuated.

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  • Driver information system

    All Audi models feature a multitude of functions. Their displays and controls are bundled into two systems that are optional in some model series, standard in others. One is the Multi Media Interface (MMI) with a large central monitor; the other is the driver information system (DIS), which is controlled via the multifunction steering wheel.

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  • The head-up display is a new, high-end feature that Audi makes available as an option in the A6 (Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 9.8 – 4.9; Combined CO₂-emissions in g/km: 229 - 129)** and A7 Sportback. It projects the most important information and indications onto the windshield. A TFT liquid crystal display backlit by a white LED generates the color image. Two aspherical mirrors enlarge it and redirect it while compensating for the distortion caused by the shape of the windshield.

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  • MMI in the Audi A8

    The Multi Media Interface (MMI) from Audi made its debut in the Audi A8 in 2002 and has since become established as the leading user interface on the market. The current large model line-up features the latest-generation MMI in slightly different configurations depending on the model.

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  • Audi offers the MMI navigation plus as an option in the large sedan model series and in the A7 Sportback. It is operated in an entirely new way – via a touchpad known as the MMI touch.

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  • The top models from Audi, from the A6 (Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 9.8 - 4.9; Combined CO₂-emissions in g/km: 229 - 129)** to the A8, integrate a multitude of infotainment and assistance functions using a new architecture. Previously developers always installed new sensors and data bus segments to meet the steadily increasing communication requirements of the controllers. Audi is using the Flex Ray bus system for the first time in the A8. This system permits transmission of data between the control units for the chassis and the assistance systems in real time.

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  • Audi A4 predictive efficiency assistant

    Another system that is unique in its class is the predictive efficiency assistant, which is available as part of the Tour assistance package. It works in close conjunction with the adaptive cruise control, the navigation system and the camera-based recognition of traffic signs. The preselected speed adapts to the road conditions by itself, e.g. the topography of the route, speed limits and the traffic ahead.

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  • Audi Q7 predictive efficiency assistant

    The adaptive cruise control system works in close coordination with the MMI navigation plus, camera-based recognition of traffic signs and the predictive efficiency assistant, another pioneering system from the assistance package Tour. It automatically adjusts the preselected speed to the conditions – the route topography, speed limits and road users ahead.

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  • Audi Q7 predictive efficiency assistant with activated adaptive cruise control

    In collaboration with adaptive cruise control (ACC) and traffic sign recognition, the predictive efficiency assistant adapts the preselected speed to the route and the speed limits. The adaptive cruise control system accelerates and brakes to keep the Q7 at the desired distance from the vehicle ahead.

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  • Audi Q2 traffic jam assist

    The traffic jam assist can take over steering work in slow-moving traffic on well-built interurban roads at speeds up to 65 km/h (40.4 mph). The system uses the radar and ultrasound sensors as well as the front camera, guiding the car by gently adjusting the steering within system limits. The traffic jam assist orients itself to the lane markings and the other vehicles on the road.

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  • Audi A4 traffic jam assist

    Another function of the ACC, the traffic-jam assist, can take over steering at speeds of up to 65 km/h (40.4 mph) on well-developed roads when traffic is congested. The system uses the radar and ultrasound sensors as well as the front camera, guiding the car by gently adjusting the steering and following the traffic ahead within system limits. In doing so, the traffic-jam assist uses the lane markings and other vehicles on the road for orientation.

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  • Audi Q7 traffic jam assist

    In the speed range of 0 to 65 km/h (40.4 mph) the traffic jam assist, another function belonging to the ACC, can also take over the steering on well-paved roads, as long as the traffic is moving slowly. The system uses the radar sensors and the video camera. It guides the car through gentle steering interventions and follows the preceding convoy of vehicles within the system limits. The traffic jam assist orientates itself by the lane markings and the other vehicles on the road.

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  • Audi Q2 pre sense front_EN

    The Q2 sets new standards with the system Audi pre sense front, which is included as standard equipment. Its radar sensor reliably recognizes critical situations involving other vehicles and crossing pedestrians ahead of the vehicle, even when visibility is poor such as in fog. If Audi pre sense front detects a pending collision, it warns the driver according to a graduated concept.

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  • Audi A4 pre sense city

    All of the versions of the new models include the safety system Audi pre sense city as standard equipment. At speeds of up to 85 km/h (52.8 mph), the system scans the road for other vehicles and pedestrians using a windshield-mounted front camera with a range of up to 100 meters (328.1 ft). If there is the threat of a collision, the driver receives a series of warnings, and if necessary the car starts to apply the brakes fully. At speeds up to 40 km/h (24.9 ft), it can fully prevent accidents within the system limits. At higher speeds up to 85 km/h (52.8 mph), warnings and brake intervention can reduce the impact velocity.

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  • Audi Q7 pre sense city

    At speeds up to 85 km/h (52.8 mph) Audi pre sense city observes the road with respect to other road users (e.g. vehicles and pedestrians). For this purpose, it uses the standard-equipped front camera on the windshield, which can capture events up to a distance of about 100 meters (328.1 ft). On threat of a collision, it warns the driver according to a graduated concept (warning, warning jolt and automatic emergency braking); if necessary, it initiates full deceleration. At speeds up to 40 km/h (24.9 mph) accidents can be avoided completely within the system limits. At higher speeds (up to 85 km/h (52.8 mph)), warnings and brake intervention can reduce the impact velocity.

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  • Audi A4 turn assist

    The turning assist is another Audi innovation that monitors oncoming traffic during left turns (on cars with left-hand drive). It has an operating range between 2 and 10 km/h (1.2 and 6.2 mph). In dangerous situations, it brings the car to a complete stop. The system becomes active in the background as soon as the driver turns on the left turn signal.

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  • Audi Q7 turn assist

    The turn assist monitors oncoming traffic when turning left at low speeds. In a dangerous situation, it slows the Q7 to a halt. This intervention keeps the Audi Q7 within its own lane. The system is enabled at speeds of between two and ten km/h (1.2 - 6.2 mph) once the driver operates the turn signal to turn left.

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  • Audi A4 exit warning

    The exit warning is activated when the new Audi A4 and Avant stop moving. If other vehicles are approaching from behind, it warns occupants as they open the doors. The system warns drivers by means of LED fiber optics in the inside door-opening mechanism (contour lighting). In situations that are assessed as dangerous, special high-performance red LEDs blink and light up. The exit warning stays on for approximately three minutes after the ignition is turned off.

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  • Audi Q7 exit warning

    The exit warning comes into play once the large SUV has stopped. Should vehicles or bicycles now approach from behind, the system warns the driver and all passengers when they start opening a door. The system uses the LED light guides of the light package in the doors – in a situation identified as hazardous, special high-power LEDs flicker and light up red. The exit warning remains in readiness for about three minutes after the ignition is switched off.

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  • Audi Q2 rear cross traffic assist

    An ideal supplement to the park assist is the cross traffic assist rear. When slowly reversing, such as when exiting a perpendicular parking spot or a narrow driveway, it warns the driver of approaching vehicles it considers to be critical. Notification is staged – visual, acoustic and finally with a jolt of the brakes. The system uses the data from the rear radar sensors.

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  • Audi A4 rear cross traffic assist

    The rear cross-traffic assist is activated when the parking assist is turned on. When this occurs, drivers who are slowly driving backwards (for example, while leaving a parking spot at right angles to the road) are warned about approaching vehicles in critical range. There are different levels of warnings: visual, acoustic and a short jolt of the brakes. The back radar sensors provide the necessary data.

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  • Audi Q7 rear cross traffic assist

    The cross-traffic assist rear uses the rear radar sensors to warn the driver, if the parking system is enabled, while reversing slowly, as when pulling out of a perpendicular parking spot in front of other vehicles detected as critical threats. The warning occurs in graduated form – visually on the MMI monitor, acoustically and, if necessary, with a jolt.

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  • Audi Q2 park assist

    The park assist is the top-of-the-line solution and can steer the Audi Q2 into parking spaces. While driving at slow speeds, two ultrasonic sensors detect suitable parallel or perpendicular parking spots. The driver just has to engage the proper gear, use the accelerator and the brakes. The park assist backs the compact SUV into the spot.

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  • Audi A4 park assist

    The Parking assistance system features the park assist (also available separately). With the help of twelve radar sensors, it helps maneuver the car into parking spaces that are parallel or at right angles to the road, which it identifies independently when driving at a moderate speed. Furthermore, it can make its own way out of parking spaces parallel to the road. All the driver has to do is accelerate, shift gears and brake.

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  • Audi Q7 park assist

    The park assist system, which practically automatically steers the new Q7 in parallel and perpendicular parking and pulls out of parallel parking spots by means of twelve ultrasonic sensors. The package also includes the 360 degree cameras. They display different views of the car’s immediate surroundings on the MMI monitor, including a virtual bird’s eye view and 180-degree images of the front and rear. Such views are very helpful with confusingly arranged exits, and in combination with the cross-traffic assist rear.

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  • Audi Q2 emergency assist

    The emergency assist activates if no reaction on the part of the driver is detected despite warnings from Audi active lane assist. After visual and acoustic warnings plus multiple brake jolts with flashing of the hazard warning lights, the final measure is for the system to autonomously bring the Q2 to a complete stop and activate the parking brake.

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  • Audi Q2 side assist_EN

    The lane change assistant Audi side assist is active at speeds of 15 km/h (9.3 mph) and above. It uses two rear-mounted radar sensors with a scanning range of roughly 70 meters (229.7 ft). If a vehicle is located in the blind spot or approaches rapidly, a warning LED in the housing of the respective exterior mirror lights up. If the driver still operates the turn signal, the LED flashes brightly several times in succession.

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  • Audi A4 allroad quattro trailer assistant

    If the new A4 allroad quattro is used as a tow vehicle, the optional trailer maneuver assist steers the car-trailer combination backwards in the direction the driver indicates with the rotary/push-button control of the MMI. It also manages turning the steering wheel in the opposite direction and stabilizes the trailer when driving straight ahead.

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  • Audi Q7 trailer assistant

    If the new Audi Q7 is serving as a towing vehicle, the driver can enable the trailer maneuver assist when reversing. The driver then need only shift to R and cautiously accelerate. He can then continuously vary the angle of reverse motion by means of the rotary/push-button control in the MMI. For traveling straight ahead, the driver taps once on the control. The picture from the rear view camera on the MMI monitor contains auxiliary lines as a guide. The trailer maneuver assist turns the steering wheel and directs the trailer onto the selected course in a stable fashion, so that the driver can steer the entire car/trailer combination by means of the rotary/push-button control of the MMI.

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  • adaptive cruise control

    The central element of the Audi driver assistance systems is the adaptive cruise control with stop & go function, an automatic distance control system. The system, which is available in a number of larger models, regulates the speed and the interval to the vehicle ahead by automatically accelerating and braking in a speed range of 0 to 250 km/h (0 – 155.34 mph).

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  • Audi lane assist

    One of the latest assistance systems from Audi is Audi active lane assist. At speeds above 60 km/h (37.28 mph), it uses a camera mounted in front of the rearview mirror to detect the lane markings. It observes the road to a distance of more than 50 meters (164.04 ft) and a coverage angle of roughly 40 degrees. It delivers 25 high-definition images per second.

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  • Audi side assist

    The lane change assistant Audi side assist is available in an entire range of Audi models. It monitors the traffic behind the vehicle and warns the driver as necessary prior to critical lane changes. The EuroNCAP safety organization recognized the potential of Audi side assist for preventing accidents and awarded it a prize in fall 2010.

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  • The night vision assistant is an assistance system for the larger model series from Audi. The heart of this system is a thermal imaging camera at the front of the vehicle. It has an angle of view of 24 degrees, and its protective window is cleaned by a separate nozzle and heated when cold. As a far infrared system (FIR), the camera reacts to the heat radiated by objects in the recorded scene. A computer transforms the information from the camera into black-and-white images and displays them on the central display located between the instruments.

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  • parking system

    Audi offers a variety of different parking systems for its complete model line-up. They use ultrasound, acoustic and optical signals, or a rearview camera whose images are displayed on the on-board monitor. The most convenient solution is the park assist.

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  • Like all assistance systems from Audi, the purpose of the speed limit display is to reduce the burden on the driver. It shows the driver the current maximum permissible speed in the instrument cluster or on the optional head-up display.

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  • Audi R8 Spyder V10 - LED headlight

    37 light-emitting diodes in each of the headlights of the new R8 Spyder produce a bright LED light that can be augmented with the optional Audi laser light. A module with four high-power laser diodes, each of which is just 300 micrometers in diameter, emit a blue laser beam with a wavelength of 450 nanometers. A phosphor converter converts it into white light with a color temperature of 5,500 Kelvin, which is pleasant to the human eye.

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  • Audi TT RS Coupé and Roadster – Matrix OLED technology

    For the first time in a series-production Audi, Matrix OLED technology (organic light emitting diode) is used in the rear lights as an option. These emit an extremely homogeneous, precise light. The light does not cast any harsh shadows and does not require any reflectors – this makes the OLEDs in 3D design efficient, lightweight and visually impressive. Each rear light contains four wafer-thin units that become smaller from the inside out. The biggest bears the TT logo and the four Audi rings.

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  • Audi R8 V10 plus – LED-headlights with Audi laser light

    The laser spot doubles the range of the high-beam light. In each headlight there is a module with four powerful laser diodes that are just 300 micrometers in diameter. They generate a blue laser beam with a wavelength of 450 nanometers. A phosphorus converter converts it into white light with a color temperature of 5,500 Kelvin that is pleasing to the human eye. The laser spot – which is active outside of urban areas at speeds of 60 km/h (37.3 mph) and above – offers tremendous advantages in terms of visibility and safety to drivers. An intelligent camera-based sensor system detects other road users and actively adjusts the light pattern to dim the light intensity specifically for them.

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  • Audi R8 LMX

    419 kW (570 hp), from 0 to 100 km/h (62.1 mph) in 3.4 seconds: The Audi R8 LMX (12.9 liters of fuel per 100 kilometers [18.2 US mpg]; 299 grams CO2 per kilometer [481.2 g/mile]) offers breathtaking performance and groundbreaking technology.** The limited-edition car is the first production car in the world to come equipped with laser high beams.

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  • Audi Matrix LED headlight

    In lighting technology, Audi is driving progress at high tempo. The innovative Matrix LED Headlights in the new Audi A8 (Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 11.3 – 5.9; Combined CO₂-emissions in g/km: 264 - 144)** make driving more composed than ever and set new benchmarks with respect to design and technology.

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  • Light systems of the future

    Audi is further extending its lead in automotive lighting technology. In the sponsored project “intelligent laser light for compact and high-resolution adaptive headlights” (iLaS), the brand with the four rings is working on the headlights of the future with partners from industry and science. Matrix Laser technology and its high resolution will make roadway illumination even more flexible and highly versatile – in all situations.Matrix Laser technology is based on the LaserSpot for high‑beam lamps, which Audi first introduced to production in the Audi R8 LMX. For the first time, bright lasers are making it possible to integrate projector technology in a compact and powerful headlight.

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  • The adaptive light is an Audi technology for the xenon plus headlights and is available in a number of different versions. In the top models its controller manages the swiveling modules so that they always deliver the perfect light for urban, interurban and highway driving. The driver can precisely control the function of the adaptive light via the Audi drive select driving dynamics system. The all-weather light integrated into the headlight replaces the fog light.

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  • LED tail lights

    Rear lights using LED technology are available either as standard or as an option in all Audi models. They produce a distinctive light pattern that in many cases also produces attractive three-dimensional effects. The LEDs are extremely long-lasting and practically maintenance-free. The most important thing, however, is how extremely quickly they reach their full luminosity: if the driver has to brake suddenly, the driver behind gains valuable fractions of a second.

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  • LED headlights

    The LED headlights are an area of technology in which Audi is well ahead of the competition. They were introduced in 2008 on the R8 high-performance sports car; since then the brand with the four rings has repeatedly extended its lead.

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  • LED daytime running lights

    The daytime running lights of white light-emitting diodes are an Audi feature that underscores the distinctive design of the vehicles while simultaneously enhancing safety. They first appeared in 2004 in the Audi A8 W12. The luxury sedan had a light unit comprising five LEDs in each headlight.

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  • Xenon headlights are gas discharge lamps. Two tungsten electrodes are sealed in the burner, a thick-walled quartz glass cylinder filled with xenon gas. A concentrated electric arc burns between the electrodes, and the inert gas filling exerts a pressure of as much as 100 bar (1,450.38 psi). The xenon gas itself gives off a somewhat violet light. Metallic salts in the filling of the gas cylinder reduce its color temperature to 4,200 Kelvin.

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  • Aud connect

    Audi vehicles are master communicators. Some of them can network with the Internet. The catchword here is Audi connect. This requires the Bluetooth car phone online, an extension of the top-of-the-line navigation system MMI navigation plus, that brings a UMTS module and a Wi-Fi hotspot to the car.

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  • Bang & Olufsen

    The collaboration between Audi and Bang & Olufsen began back at the turn of the century. In 2005, the first Advanced Sound System was available as an option in the Audi A8. The openly propagated collaboration was a novelty in the European automobile industry and a great success. Today the Danish company’s high-end systems are available in numerous Audi models.

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  • Red lights not only annoy the driver, they also have a negative impact on the environment. In its efforts to improve efficiency, Audi is developing concepts for the intelligently managed traffic of tomorrow. As part of the travolution project, the engineers have developed  a method by which the cars can communicate with traffic lights. This reduces fuel consumption and consequently emissions.

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  • The top-of-the-line system from Audi puts the brand in the pole position when it comes to multimedia. The MMI navigation plus is available for the large models, but is also available in a very similar form for the compact A1 (Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 7.1 – 3.8; Combined CO₂-emissions in g/km: 162 - 99)**.

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  • The top navigation system, the MMI navigation plus, is networked in a pioneering manner with the driver assistance and safety systems on board the large Audi models. Its navigation database describes the entire European road system in countless details.

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  • As the name suggests, Rear Seat Entertainment is a multimedia system for the rear seat. The latest version of this system is used in the A8. The backrests of the driver and front-passenger seats each integrate a high-resolution display measuring 10.2 inches diagonally. They can be tilted 10 degrees and are capable of displaying different content. A sensor enables their brightness to adjust automatically to the lighting conditions inside the vehicle. They are controlled via a separate MMI controller in the rear center armrest.

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  • When it comes to sound systems, Audi listens to the wishes of its customers. There are three systems from which to choose in the A8, for example. The Audi Sound System is standard, with Bose surround sound and the Bang & Olufsen Advanced Sound System available as options. Audi know-how is incorporated into all three solutions.

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  • “German engineering meets Silicon Valley” – a fitting slogan to describe the partnership that Audi has been nurturing with the Nvidia Corporation since 2005. This partnership quickly moved the brand with the four rings into a leading position in automotive infotainment. Nvidia technology enabled such innovations as the world’s first integration of Google Earth navigation and the elegant graphics featured in many models.

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  • Passengers in many models are protected by the Audi adaptive restraint system, which in some model series is networked with the predictive safety system Audi pre sense. The system draws its information from an entire array of acceleration and pressure sensors.

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  • Audi prologue piloted driving

    Heralding a new design era: the Audi prologue piloted driving showcarThe Audi prologue piloted driving show car is a focus at CES. It not only stands for a new design era, but also integrates many innovations in the areas of connectivity, infotainment and user interface which Audi will be showing at 2015 CES. In this connection, this show car’s laser matrix headlights and perimeter sensorics will demonstrate how the car of the future will become ever more of an assistant to its occupants. After all, the Audi prologue piloted driving stands for the state of technology, which includes piloted driving.

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  • Audi pre sense

    Audi pre sense is a technology package for predictive safety. It is available in a number of different expanded levels in most of the larger Audi model series.

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Audi Technology Portal

At Audi, the body is much more than a car's shell; it is a technical highlight and provides the basis for a numberof qualities. Lightweight design, precision, stiffness, vehicle dynamics, safety and aerodynamics - the brand with the four rings is far ahead of the competition in all of these areas.

  • Low wind noise is an important comfort factor, particularly on the highway. At speeds of 120 km/h (74.56 mph), the whooshing of the wind is the loudest source of noise in the interior of many cars.

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  • Air flow around the Audi Q5

    Aerodynamic drag plays an important role in customers’ driving behavior. In cars such as the A8, which are used predominantly for long-distance travel, aerodynamic drag also accounts for almost half of the running resistance. Outfitted with the 4.2 FSI, the luxury sedan has a drag coefficient of 0.26 and a frontal area of 2.41 sq m (25.94 sq ft). Low lift coefficients at the front and rear axles ensure confident stability at highway speeds.

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  • Air flow through the engine compartment

    The study of air flow through the engine compartment is a relatively recent branch of aerodynamics. In the new models, the area around the grille is thoroughly sealed so that the inflowing air reaches the radiator with virtually no losses instead of becoming turbulent.

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  • Underfloor of the Audi R8

    A car produces 40 to 50 percent of its total aerodynamic drag in and around the underbody, the wheels and the wheel arches. Audi has an excellent tool for optimizing these zones – the aeroacoustic wind tunnel. With its rolling floor and the four small treadmills on which the wheels can turn, it provides insightful and detailed analyses.

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  • Audi R8 Spyder V10 - multimaterial construction principle

    According to DIN unladen weight without driver, the new Audi R8 Spyder* tips the scales at just 1,720 kilograms (3,792.0 lb); dry weight is a mere 1,612 kilograms (3,553.9 lb). The key to this outstanding figure is the new multimaterial Audi Space Frame (ASF). It combines aluminum components with components made of structurally integrated carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP). The ASF in the new Audi R8 Spyder has a total weight of just 208 kilograms (458.6 lb).

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  • Audi R8 V10 plus and Audi R8 LMS

    When it introduced the first A8 in 1994, Audi had not only developed the radically new ASF design and put it into series production, it had also developed all of the steps required for its production. The launch was preceded by a development process lasting 12 years. Since this time Audi has built on its competitive edge step by step. The arc spans three generations of the A8 and also includes the A2 along with its legendary three-liter version, the A2 1.2 TDI. By the end of 2010 alone, the company had produced some 550,000 vehicles with the ASF body – far more than any other manufacturer in the world.

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  • The R8 V10 plus* has a dry weight of 1,454 kilograms (3,205.5 lb). The key factor behind the consistent lightweight design is the body shell with multimaterial Audi Space Frame (ASF): It weighs only 200 kilograms (440.9 lb). The resulting unladen weight of 1,555 kilograms (3,428.2 lb) leads to a superior power-to-weight ratio of 3.46 kg/kW (2.55 kg/hp).

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  • Aluminum is an excellent material for vehicle bodies. With its low density of 2.7 grams per cubic centimeter (0.098 lb per cu in), it is roughly two-thirds lighter than conventional grades of steel, and since it is a relatively soft metal, it is easy to machine. Alloys, the most important components of which are magnesium and silicon, provide the high strength necessary for vehicle bodies.

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  • Semi-finished components

    The ASF body comprises three semi-finished components: extruded sections, diecast components and aluminum panels. Audi engineers employ each of these components following the principle: “The right material in the right place for optimal function.”

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  • A number of steel bodies from Audi, from the A1 (Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 7.1 – 3.8; Combined CO₂-emissions in g/km: 162 – 99)** to the A7 Sportback, comprise significant proportions of high- and ultra high-strength steels of different strength classes. The best of these are the hot-shaped steels, which stand out due to their extreme tensile strength and the resulting weight-savings potential.

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  • Audi is taking the development of the steel body a step further – to the Multimaterial Space Frame, which combines components of aluminum, steel and fiber-reinforced polymers (FRP) with one another. The future of this new “ultra” technology has already begun with the bodies of the A7 Sportback and the new A6 (Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 9.6 – 4.4; Combined CO₂-emissions in g/km: 225 – 114)**.

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  • Crash safety

    In every development process, crash safety is of utmost priority for Audi. Each new model must comply not only with European standards, but also with the regulations of major export countries as well as strict specifications that the brand itself has defined.

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  • Cars from Audi also meet all the requirements in the event of an accident involving a pedestrian. In the A8, for example, a foam component between the front bumper and its cross-member lessens the impact on the knees.

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  • Undesired resonant vibrations in the body are strictly taboo. At Audi a great deal of work goes into preventing or minimizing such vibrations. In the A8, for example, the development engineers specifically analyzed and minimized all vibration levels at the contact points between the passengers and the body – the floor panel, the seats, the steering wheel, and the inside mirror.

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  • Torsional stiffness in the Audi Q5

    Static torsional stiffness, the resistance to torsion in the longitudinal direction, is a critical factor in determining a body’s strength and a primary consideration for each new design from Audi. In the A8, for example, torsional stiffness increased by approximately 25 percent compared with the previous model. In the TT Coupé the increase was 50 percent, and in the TT Roadster an outstanding 100 percent.

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  • Carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP) are particularly attractive materials for the “ultra” lightweight design from Audi. The brand already offers a number of large and small CFRP components, primarily in the R8 model family. These range all the way to partially self-supporting structural components such as the side walls and the cover for the top component in the R8 Spyder.

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  • Fiber-reinforced polymers (FRP) offer many advantageous possibilities for the “ultra” lightweight design of the future. Development engineers at Audi are by no means fixated on CFRP alone. They are instead exploring all avenues.

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Audi Technology Portal

The sporty character of all Audi models is essentially rooted in their chassis. Sophisticated yet lightweight suspension and steering systems, powerful brakes and highly intelligent electronics together make for a fascinating driving experience.

  • ESC (ESP) with electronic limited slip differential

    Many Audi front-wheel-drive models come equipped with sporty suspension technology as standard. The ESC stabilization program with electronic limited slip differential is an intelligent software solution.

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  • The brake assembly matrix from Audi provides the appropriate components for each model. Powerful performance, extreme robustness, low weight and state-of-the-art technology are the features common to all of them.

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  • Alloy wheels from Audi are elegant, high-quality and lightweight. After all, Audi has made lightweight design a top priority in wheel development, too. Various methods are available to achieve this. Many designs today are being produced using flow-forming technology. This is a process in which the rim well of a cast wheel is rolled out over a cylinder at high pressure and a temperature of over 300 degrees Celsius (572 degrees Fahrenheit). The system shapes the wheel blank in a single step, in a manner similar to a potter’s wheel. In so doing, it compresses the material, allowing a thinner wall thickness. The wheel becomes lighter and at the same time sturdier. Flow-forming wheels are several hundred grams lighter than conventional wheels, depending on their dimensions.

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  • Safety, efficiency, comfort and precise handling characteristics – these are the primary qualities of the tires that Audi develops for its cars and installs in the factory. This holds true for every model for tires ranging from 15 to over 20 inches in the diagonal and from just under 200 millimeters (7.87 in) to over 300 millimeters (11.81 in) in width.

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  • Tire pressure monitoring system

    Many models from Audi are equipped with a tire pressure monitoring system that is integrated into the electronic stabilization program (ESP). This is a system that measures indirectly, has no sensors of its own in the tire and thus adds no weight and requires no maintenance. It alerts the driver in the event of pressure loss by displaying a warning on the onboard monitor. If only one tire is affected, the position of the tire is indicated. The system also detects a gradual loss of pressure through diffusion in all four tires, resulting in a higher rolling resistance and increased fuel consumption.

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  • Audi Q7 all-wheel steering

    Audi offers another groundbreaking innovation as an option: all-wheel steering. A steering system with an electric spindle drive turns the rear wheels inward by as much as five degrees depending on the situation.

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  • Front suspension

    The model line-up from Audi is extensive, and the same applies for the layout of the wheel suspensions. Three different basic constructions are used for the front suspension.

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  • Steering systems are a technical field in which Audi invests a great deal of innovative know-how. Every model comes with standard power rack-and-pinion steering; its optional or standard power assist is based on the driving speed. In all cases, the driver experiences a firm, sporty feel at the wheel and precise, finely differentiated feedback from the road.

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  • Dynamic steering

    Audi will include its high-tech dynamic steering on request in some model lines. Dynamic steering varies the steering ratio by nearly 100 percent as a function of driving speed and the setting in the Audi drive select system in which it is integrated. Transitions are continuous and practically imperceptible.

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  • Guidance, self-steering, suspension – the rear suspension performs important functions in every car. Audi uses four different basic designs in its model range

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  • Audi Q5 – adaptive air suspensiopn with damper control

    An especially attractive solution is the suspension with damper control, which is available for all engine versions with a quattro drive. Its design is based on the CDC principle (CDC: continuous damping control): Electromagnetically actuated valves in the damper piston alter the through-flow cross-sectional area for the hydraulic fluid as necessary. 

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  • Audi A5 Coupé – Suspension with damper control

    The all-new chassis is among the strengths of the Audi A5 Coupé*, including with respect to systematic lightweight construction and precise response. From dynamic handling to comfortable cruising – the two-door coupé has luxury-class qualities.

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  • Dynamic Ride Control

    Audi currently offers Dynamic Ride Control technology in the RS 5, among other models. DRC is a purely mechanical, and thus fully lag-free, system for reducing body roll and pitch around the transverse and longitudinal axes.

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  • The Audi drive select dynamic handling system lends fascinating breadth to the driving experience. Audi offers it in most of its models – as an option in some, a standard feature in others, and with the possibility of modular expansion in all of them.

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  • adaptive magnetic ride

    Audi magnetic ride is a suspension technology employed in the A3, TT and R8 families. This system continually adapts the function of the shock absorbers to the road profile and the driver’s style.

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  • adaptive air suspension

    The adaptive air suspension – air suspension with controlled damping – provides the full-size models like the A6 allroad quattro (Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 8.9 – 6.1; Combined CO₂-emissions in g/km: 206 - 159)** with smooth ride comfort and sporty handling.

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www.audi-technology-portal.de

Audi Technology Portal

Audi is hard at work on mobility for the future, with electrification of the powertrain playing a leading role. The new hybrid and electric vehicles form a strong cornerstone of the brand's strategy for helping shape trends in society and developments in the markets.

  • Audi e-tron quattro concept

    Aerodynamically-optimized design with a drag coefficient of 0.25, a purely electric e-tron quattro drivetrain with up to 370 kW of power output – the Audi e‑tron quattro concept is an all-electric, full-size class sport SUV. The technology study provides a firm glimpse at the production model to follow in 2018. And it is a statement about the future of electric mobility: It is sporty, efficient and suitable for everyday use.

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  • Audi A4 Avant g-tron

    The Audi A4 Avant g-tron* is the second model after the A3 Sportback g-tron* that customers can run on compressed natural gas (CNG) or Audi e-gas. Its 2.0 TFSI engines has an output of 125 kW (170 hp) and torque of 270 Nm (199.1 lb-ft).

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  • Audi A3 e-tron

    From 0 to 100 km/h (62.14 mph) in 7.6 seconds and a top speed of 222 km/h (137.94 mph) – the Audi A3 Sportback e-tron adds an extra highlight to the sporty character of the compact premium car line. In accordance with the ECE standard for plug-in hybrid vehicles, its average CO2 emissions are a mere 35 grams per km (56.33 g/mile) – equivalent to consumption of 1.5 liters of fuel per 100 km (156.81 US mpg).**

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  • Audi R18 e-tron quattro

    Audi is starting the 2015 season with a thoroughly revised R18 e-tron quattro. In the FIA World Endurance Championship (WEC) and in the Le Mans 24 Hours as the season’s pinnacle event, Audi is going to compete with a hybrid sports car in the 4-megajoule class.

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  • Audi A3 g-tron

    The Audi A3 Sportback g-tron, the brand’s first natural gas car to go into production, reveals the sheer depth of the technological expertise of Audi – from ultra lightweight technology through the highly advanced infotainment to the driver assistance systems. It showcases state-of-the-art CNG technology (CNG = compressed natural gas), complete with the fuel storage technology. Its two pressurized tanks beneath the trunk floor each hold around seven kilograms (15.43 lb) of gas; they essentially use the recess for the spare wheel, thus impinging only minimally on the load capacity.

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  • Audi R8 e-tron: Drive system

    The Audi R8 e-tron weighs in at 1,780 kilograms (3,924.23 lb). Its body structure, including the side sections, weighs just 199 kilograms (438.72 lb), 23 kilograms (50.71 lb) less than that of the R8 Coupé, which already sets the bar very high with its aluminum-based ASF principle (Audi Space Frame). Here, Audi presents a new stage in the development of its ultra lightweight construction technology – a Multimaterial Space Frame, in which large parts made of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) supplement the aluminum frame.

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  • Audi Q3 cylinder on demand (COD)

    Audi is driving forward progress in its gasoline engines. The term Rightsizing incorporates a host of innovative technologies. The key is to design engines with the optimum combination of displacement, power and torque delivery, fuel consumption and operating characteristics. Cylinder deactivation in the 4.0 TFSI is one example.

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  • iHEV system

    Audi is working on new, intelligent technologies to reduce fuel consumption even further. The predictive efficiency assistant uses data from the navigation system to enable the car to slow down in an anticipatory manner.

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  • Audi offers full hybrids with lithium-ion batteries in three vehicle classes. The A6 hybrid (Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 6.2; Combined CO₂-emissions in g/km: 145)**, the A8 hybrid and the Q5 hybrid quattro (Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 6.9; Combined CO₂-emissions in g/km: 159)** use a parallel driveline – a highly efficient concept.

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  • Audi is systematically working out all aspects of electric mobility from the ground up. The e performance research project – a think tank within the company – has developed a modular component system for electrically powered vehicles. This has resulted in a sporty research vehicle, the F12, in the framework of a research project sponsored by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF).

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  • The term e-tron covers all Audi cars that can drive for longer distances on electricity alone. The brand is working on all aspects of the issue and with different approaches – from pure electric drive through plug-in hybrids to the electric quattro driveline.The Audi R8 e-tron, the first low-volume electric vehicle to be produced by Audi, is an uncompromising, high-performance sports car. Its two electric motors deliver an output of 280 kW (381 hp) and 820 Nm of torque. All of the energy comes from the large lithium-ion battery that stores 48.6 kWh. The Audi R8 e-tron completes the sprint from zero to 100 km/h in 4.6 seconds, achieves an electronically limited top speed of 200 km/h and covers a range of around 215 km.

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  • With the electric biturbo, Audi is taking another major step forward in its TDI engines. In this forward-looking technology an additional compressor assists the turbocharger in the lower rev range.Almost a quarter of a century ago, Audi delivered a major boost to diesel engine development worldwide. 1989 saw the debut in the Audi 100 of the first direct injection compression ignition engine with turbocharging and electronic control, since when the TDI has enjoyed an impressive and ongoing success story.

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  • Video: e-fuels

    Audi is promoting the development of new CO₂-neutral fuels.** The underlying technology is completely new: Microorganisms utilize solar energy to produce synthetic ethanol and synthetic diesel from carbon dioxide and water.The problem has been familiar for a long time, but it has yet to be solved: The combustion of conventional petroleum fuels pollutes the atmosphere by releasing carbon dioxide into it. Ethanol and diesel made from renewable raw materials such as maize and rapeseed generally achieve a better environmental balance, because the plants have already previously absorbed the CO₂ that is released when they are combusted.** But such fuels are costly and compete with food agriculture – so they do not represent a long-term solution in a world whose population continues to grow increasingly rapidly.

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  • e-gas project

    By 2013, the Audi a-gas project will make the brand with the four rings the first automaker worldwide to have built a whole chain of sustainable energy sources.

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  • Umweltbilanz

    Audi creates an ecobalance for each new model that evaluates all phases of its lifecycle. The brand’s lightweight and efficient models are particularly effective during the operating phase – thanks to know-how in ultra-lightweight design and drive technology.Ecobalance, also known as life cycle analysis or life cycle assessment (LCA), analyzes the environmental impact of a product throughout its entire lifecycle. It serves as a quantitative evaluation of ecological aspects such as the emission of greenhouse gases (including CO₂)**, energy consumption, acidification or summer smog. In compiling ecobalances, Audi uses a standardized procedure in accordance with ISO 14040.

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  • The Audi e-bike Wörthersee is a high-performance sports machine for sporty people. Its design reflects the concentrated dynamism of the brand, with CFRP playing a major role in its ultra-lightweight design principle.The changed role that the car will adopt in the mobility of tomorrow is creating space in the world’s major cities for new means of transport – for lean, lightweight and efficient vehicles with two, three or four wheels, for e-pedelecs, e-skateboards, e-trikes or even e-quads. Audi designers are picking up on this trend and transferring it into the brand’s progressive design language.

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  • Audi urban concept spyder

    The Audi urban concept Spyder technology study is a showcase for the mobility of tomorrow. The electrically driven show car brings together elements of a race car, a roadster, a fun car and a city car.

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  • An important aspect of the Audi Urban Future Initiative is the award established in 2010. With a prize of 100,000 Euros, it is Germany’s most highly endowed architecture competition. This year, the award is being offered for the second time and is centered on the question of how mobility can become an engine for urban development. The five participating architecture and urban planning firms are called CRIT (Mumbai), Höweler & Yoon Architecture (Boston/Washington), NODE Architecture & Urbanism (Pearl River Delta), Superpool (Istanbul) and Urban-Think Tank (São Paulo).

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  • Many of the projects being run by Audi address the ongoing development of the world’s rapidly growing cities. In the Audi Urban Future Initiative, one of the company’s think tanks, we are seeking intelligent approaches for the mobility of tomorrow. The Audi Urban Future Initiative was established in 2010. It is a global forum that brings together experts from diverse cultures and disciplines. Architects, sociologists, urban planners and trend researchers discuss new approaches and solutions for mobility in the world’s megacities. The focus is on a wide range of topics – such as seamless mobility through the interconnection of various means of transportation, the flexible use of space or the vision of the city as a continuous flow of movement without stationary traffic. An important element of the initiative is the Audi Urban Future Award, which Audi offered for the first time in 2010.

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  • Audi is interested in the design ideas of students – such as those from this project with the Royal College of Art in London.Audi has an enlightened approach to design and is constantly seeking fresh ideas. One key aspect is the cooperations with renowned schools of design – such as the Pforzheim University School of Design, the Royal College of Art in London, the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California and two schools of design in Milan.

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  • How will mobility in the world’s megacities evolve; what form will it take in future? The Audi Urban Future Initiative is seeking answers to these questions.

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  • Audi e-tron Sportback concept

    Design study and technology demonstrator, electric car and power pack in the guise of a coupé: A versatile concept car makes its world debut in the Chinese metropolis of Shanghai as the Audi e-tron Sportback concept. The brand with the four rings presents the study of a four-door Gran Turismo with a powerful 320 kW electric drive at the Auto Shanghai 2017 this spring. The formal idiom of the coupé with Lux Silver paint finish combines classic Audi elements with an array of trendsetting details: an electrifying architecture, tailored consistently to the technology and the package of the electric drive.

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  • Audi h-tron quattro concept_ENG

    High range, swift refueling, sporty road performance: The Audi h‑tron quattro concept car can boast all these virtues. It combines a highly efficient fuel cell achieving an output of up to 110 kW with a powerful battery that can provide a temporary boost of 100 kW. The car can be fully refueled with hydrogen in around four minutes, and is then ready to drive for up to 600 kilometers (372.8 mi).

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  • Audi prologue Avant

    The plug-in hybrid drive of the Audi prologue Avant is almost identical to the powertrain in the Audi Q7 e-tron quattro* which will be launched in summer 2015. The 3.0 TDI engine installed in the Audi prologue Avant outputs a maximum of 260 kW (353 hp), a powerful electric motor integrated in the eight-speed tiptronic contributes up to 100 kW. System output is 335 kW (455 hp), while system torque is 750 Nm (553.2 lb-ft). The eight speed tiptronic directs engine power to the quattro permanent all-wheel drive ensuring superior drive characteristics in any situation. 

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  • Audi Q7 e-tron 3.0 TDI quattro

    It accelerates from a standstill to 100 km/h (62.1 mph)in six seconds, and yet consumes not even two liters of diesel per 100 kilometers (117.6 US mpg). The Audi Q7 e-tron quattro is sporty, comfortable and at the same time highly efficient. The world’s first TDI plug in hybrid with quattro drive, it is also the first plug-in hybrid with a diesel engine from Audi.

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  • Audi A7 Sportback h-tron quattro

    It sprints from 0 to 100 km/h (62.1 mph) in 7.9 seconds and reaches a top speed of 200 km/h (124.3 mph). It can cover more than 500 kilometers (310.7 mi) on a single tank, with nothing more than a few drops of water leaving the tailpipe. The A7 Sportback h‑tron quattro* uses a 170 kW electric drive system with a fuel cell as the energy source. Each of the two electric motors drive the wheels of one axle. The Audi technical concept car is a true quattro and thus unique among fuel cell automobiles. 

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  • Audi R18 e-tron quattro 2014

    The Audi R18 e-tron quattro is the most complex race car created in Ingolstadt and Neckarsulm to date. This not only applies to the mechanics. The electronics of the most recent LMP1 race car with the four rings is more sophisticated than ever before.The age of electronic data transmission from the race car on track began for Audi in 1989. At that time, an Audi 90 quattro in the IMSA GTO series radioed eight parameters to the garage where engine speeds and a few pressures and temperatures were plotted on printouts – a tiny step from today’s perspective, but one that provided important insights at the time.

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  • Audi A8 hybrid

    The Audi A8 hybrid is designed as a parallel hybrid. Its combustion engine and the electric motor are located one directly behind the other and are linked by a clutch to work together, when necessary. Their interplay – referred to as “boosting” – briefly results in a peak system output of 180 kW (245 hp) and a maximum system torque of 480 Nm (354.03 lb ft).

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  • Audi Q5 hybrid quattro

    The Q5 hybrid quattro is designed as a parallel hybrid – a convincingly efficient concept. Its electric motor generates 33 kW and is located directly behind the combustion engine, a 2.0 TFSI developing 155 kW (211 hp). Both drives can be disengaged by means of a clutch according to complex control logic. They transfer their power to a heavily modified eight-speed tiptronic that does not include a torque converter. The disc-shaped electric motor occupies the space previously occupied by the torque converter.

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  • Audi can look back on over 20 years of experience in hybrid technology. The first generation of the Audi duo had its debut as early as 1989 – a concept car based on an Audi 100 Avant. A five-cylinder gasoline engine drove the front wheels, and a part-time electric motor developing 9 kW (12 hp) drove the rear wheels. Nickel-cadmium batteries served as energy stores. Another duo variant based on an Audi 100 Avant quattro followed two years later.

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  • Audi R18 2016 en

    For the FIA World Endurance Championship (WEC) and the Le Mans 24 Hours, Audi is emphasizing focal areas in the 2016 season: The Audi R18 that has been redesigned from scratch has almost nothing in common anymore with its predecessor. It features a more radical aerodynamics concept, including a new safety cell, its hybrid drive system is battery-operated for the first time, the V6 TDI engine has been revised, and new system solutions have been added. As a result, Audi’s LMP1 sports car is a vehicle that is more powerful and – once more – clearly more efficient than its predecessor. While the new R18 is Audi’s strongest race car to date, it consumes less fuel than any of the generations before it.

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  • Audi SQ7 TDI – V8 TDI with electric powered compressor and 48 volt electrical subsystem

    The 4.0 TDI has been newly developed from the ground up. It combines best-in-class performance with low consumption and guarantees maximum dynamics. The V8 engine has a displacement of 3,956 cc. The two exhaust-gas turbochargers are activated selectively according to the concept of sequential charging, since exhaust gas only flows through one turbocharger at low and intermediate load. The second turbine is only activated at higher loads. An electric powered compressor (EPC) augments the work of the two turbochargers, particularly in the lower engine speed range, providing for extremely dynamic off-the-line performance.

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  • Audi SQ7 TDI – 48 volt electrical subsystem with electromechanical active roll stabilization

    A new solution in the competitive environment is the electromechanical active body roll stabilization. Here a compact electric motor with a three-stage planetary gearbox separates the two halves of the stabilizer. On an uneven road surface, they are actively decoupled from one another, resulting in improved ride comfort. During sporty driving, the tubes are interconnected and twisted against each other. That significantly reduces body roll, i.e. the lean of the car. Together with the transmission, the electric motors produce anything up to 1,200 Nm (885.1 lb‑ft) of torque. The effect is taut, sporty handling: The car leans less in bends and the tendency to understeer is further reduced.

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  • Brake system in the Audi Q5 hybrid quattro

    Electric motors offer interesting possibilities for intelligent drive management. Audi is making use of these in two fields of technology – energy recovery and quattro permanent all-wheel drive.

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  • The battery in an electrified vehicle powertrain is a highly complex system. The lithium-ion technology offers opportunities and challenges in a number of areas – weight, energy, the package, safety, lifetime and, not least, cost.

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  • Electric motor in the Audi Q5 hybrid quattro

    Electric motors are outstanding in their high reliability, low weight and high efficiency – in the range of 93 to 97 percent through a relatively broad rpm range. Unlike internal combustion engines, electric motors yield their maximum torque at extremely low rpms, practically from the starting position. For this reason, single-stage transmissions are usually all that’s needed in purely electrical vehicles.

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  • Power electronics is one of the most complex and also most costly components in the electrified powertrain: a pulse-controlled inverter that transforms the battery’s DC voltage to AC voltage as required by the electric motor.

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  • Audi pays strict attention to safety where electric mobility is concerned. The battery, the cables and all other high-voltage components are elaborately protected – in case of an accident, during operation, in assembly and during servicing.

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  • Thermal management for the future is a highly complex concept with promising new solutions. Audi has stepped up the pace of development in this area.

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